First of all, Don’t Panic Or Worry. We have time 25th May 2018 is “Deadline Day” but don’t believe everything you read. GDPR Compliance? What is it??

With email marketin being attacked with GDPR regulations we have put together some information that may help you with keeping complaint when using email marketing.

One of the major areas of change—and the one that’s been causing email marketers the biggest headache—is the question of how to collect and store consent. GDPR raises the bar to a higher standard of consent for subscribers based in the UK, meaning that the way your brand has collected consent from UK subscribers in the past might not be compliant anymore.

GDPR goes beyond the consent required under the UK Privacy Directive, which is currently in effect across the UK. The new regulation requires that brands collect affirmative consent that is freely given, specific and informed to now be compliant.

The information commissioners office (ICO) has provided a comprehensive guide about being compliant and details consent further than this post. If you’re not ready to dive into the full 39-page guide just yet, here’s a breakdown of the five most important things you must know about email consent under GDPR—with some examples of how we put them into action here at ValiantIT.

1. CONSENT REQUIRES A POSITIVE OPT-IN. DON’T USE PRE-TICKED BOXES.

For consent to be valid under GDPR, a customer must actively confirm their consent, such as ticking an unchecked opt-in box. Pre-checked boxes that use customer inaction to assume consent aren’t valid under GDPR.

2. KEEP CONSENT REQUESTS SEPARATE FROM OTHER TERMS & CONDITIONS.

Email consent must be freely given—and that’s only the case if a person truly has a choice of whether or not they’d like to subscribe to marketing messages. If subscribing to a newsletter is required in order to download a whitepaper, for example, then that consent is not freely given.

Under GDPR, email consent needs to be separate. Never bundle consent to your terms and conditions, privacy notices, or any of your services, unless email consent is necessary to complete that service.

4. KEEP EVIDENCE OF CONSENT—WHO, WHEN, HOW.

GDPR not only sets the rules for how to collect consent but also requires companies to keep a record of these consents.

5. CHECK YOUR CONSENT PRACTICES AND YOUR EXISTING CONSENTS.

GDPR does not only apply to signups that happen after May 25th, it applies to all existing EU subscribers on your email list. If your existing subscribers have given your consent in a way that’s already compliant with GDPR—and if you kept a record of those consents—there’s no need for you to re-collect consent from those subscribers. If your existing records don’t meet GDPR requirements, however, you have to take action.

For other GDPR posts that may help you we have some more content for you to read on our blog.

we offer our expertise at low fixed prices, so you can be sure you are getting the best possible value. Our services range from server support to remote IT support, and each job is undertaken with the utmost professionalism and efficiency. To find out more about what we do, please get in touch with our Southend Office today and we will be more than happy to help.